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After Year Like This, World Prepares for a Strange New Year’s Eve

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After Year Like This, World Prepares for a Strange New Year’s Eve

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NEW YORK (AP) – If ever a year’s end seemed like cause for celebration, 2020 might be it.

Yet the coronavirus scourge that dominated the year is also looming over New Year’s festivities and forcing officials worldwide to tone them down.

From New York’s Times Square to Sydney Harbor, big public blowouts are being turned into TV-only shows and digital events. Fireworks displays have been canceled from the Las Vegas Strip to the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. Even private parties in some places are restricted.

The occasion stirs mixed feelings for people like Cesar Soltero, who was taking photos, and taking stock, in Times Square this week.

“I’m going to celebrate that I’m alive, but I’m not precisely too happy for this year,” said Mr. Soltero, 36, an engineer visiting from Orlando, Florida, after forgoing his usual holiday trip to see family in Mexico.

Simona Faidiga and Alessandro Nunziata strolled through Times Square. The Italian couple moved to Miami for new jobs in March, just as the pandemic froze tourism. He is working as a sales representative, but she is not back at work yet. And they are not ready to declare 2021 will be better, not wanting to jinx it.

“I mean, I don’t think it could be worse than 2020,” said Mr. Nunziata, 27.

Days ahead of the ball drop in Times Square, it clearly was not New Year’s as usual at the Crossroads of the World.

New Year’s Eve will look different around the world after a year in which the virus killed an estimated 1.8 million people.

Germany banned the sale of fireworks, which residents usually set off in on the streets, and a pyrotechnics show at Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate is off.

So, too, are the fireworks over the River Thames in locked-down London, where New Year’s Eve also marks Britain’s final economic split from the European Union. However, Big Ben, which has been largely silent since 2017 while its clock tower is restored, will sound 12 bongs at midnight.

The Netherlands moved the national countdown from an Amsterdam park to a soccer stadium, where spectators will not be allowed in and pyrotechnics will be replaced with “electric fireworks.”

In Rome, the fireworks are still on, but customary concerts in public plazas have been scrapped in favor of livestreamed performances and art installations. Pope Francis will skip his typical December 31 visit to the Vatican’s life-sized Nativity scene in St. Peter’s Square and plans to deliver his New Year’s Day presentation indoors, to prevent crowds from gathering.

Rio de Janeiro nixed the fireworks, open-air concerts and rooftop parties that draw crowds of white-clad revelers in the Copacabana neighborhood, where only residents will be allowed in.

In Russia, New Year’s Eve has been more widely celebrated than Christmas, which is marked on January 7 by the country’s Orthodox Christian majority. Public events have been banned or restricted in many regions. But the country’s so-called New Year’s Eve capital, the city of Kaluga, is luring tourists with a week of festivities, despite pleas from residents to cancel. Officials in Kaluga, 90 miles southwest of Moscow, said virus precautions will be taken.

Turkey declared a four-day lockdown starting on New Year’s Eve, and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan warned that security forces will inspect hotels for illicit parties.

In the U.S., the Christmas morning bombing of the downtown tourist district in Nashville, Tennessee, led the city to cancel its plan to light fireworks and blow up a 2020 sign.

“To say it would have been tone deaf would be an understatement,” said Bruce Spyridon, president of the Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp.

Back in New York, yoga and stress-management instructor Allison Richard, 39, wrote up a few New Year’s wishes on confetti that will be dropped at midnight in Times Square.

“Freedom,” she wrote, and “contentment,” “commitment,” “connection,” “prosperity” and “love.”

 
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  • ANALYSIS
Hope for 2021?
Back in July, The Associated Press published the article “Wait ‘til next year: Giving up on 2020, looking toward 2021.” The title perfectly summarized the hopes of many.


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