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The Real Truth - A Magazine Restoring Plain Understanding

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  • INTERNATIONAL

At first, the coronavirus was just a rumor along the dusty lanes of the displaced persons’ camp that Habiba Ali calls home. It seemed fantastical: an illness sweeping the world far beyond Somalia’s borders, killing thousands of people and sending some of the richest countries into panic.

Then Somalia’s first virus case was announced on March 16, and one of the world’s most fragile nations staggered even more. Nearly three decades of conflict, extremist attacks, drought, disease and a devastating outbreak of locusts have taken a vast toll.

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  • SOCIETY & LIFESTYLES

For most Americans alive today, the idea of shared national sacrifice is a collective abstraction, a memory handed down from a grandparent or passed on through a book or movie.

Not since World War II—when people carried ration books with stamps that allowed them to purchase meat, sugar, butter, cooking oil and gasoline, when buying cars, firewood and nylon was restricted, when factories converted from making automobiles to making tanks, Jeeps and torpedoes, when men were drafted and women volunteered in the war effort—has the entire nation been asked to sacrifice for a greater good.

  • World News Desk
  • EDUCATION

Students struggling to get online in a rural South Carolina county received a boost with the arrival of six buses equipped with Wi-Fi, some of the hundreds the state has rolled out since schools were closed by the coronavirus outbreak.

With routers mounted inside, the buses broadcast enough bandwidth in an area the size of a small parking lot for parents to drive up and children to access the internet from inside their cars.

Learn the why behind the headlines.

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  • World News Desk
  • TERRORISM & SECURITY

Both the Islamic State group and al-Qaida see the coronavirus as a threat, but some of their fighters also see the upheaval from the pandemic as an opportunity to win over more supporters and strike harder than before.

Messages from the Islamic extremist groups show concern about the virus mixed with bravado, asserting that it is punishment for non-Muslims while also urging followers to repent and take care of themselves.

  • Articles
  • MEDIA

There is an ever-growing feeling toward the news these days. Call it what you may: burnout, numbness, strain, desensitization or outright apathy.

In the United States, people who feel overwhelmed by the 24/7 news cycle significantly outnumber those who are comfortable with it. According to a 2018 survey by the Pew Research Center, nearly “seven-in-ten Americans (68%) feel worn out by the amount of news there is these days, compared with only three-in-ten who say they like the amount of news they get.”

  • World News Desk
  • HEALTH ISSUES

A few weeks ago, Debbie Cameron saw her grandsons most days, playing the piano, making after-school snacks or singing nursery rhymes with the baby in her Chandler, Arizona, home.

Then the cornavirus crisis hit and the boys were suddenly gone. Mrs. Cameron is 68 and has asthma, making her one of the people most at risk of getting seriously ill or dying. Now she sees her grandchildren from behind the glass of a window or a phone screen.

  • World News Desk
  • EUROPE

As increasing numbers of European hospitals buckle under the strain of tens of thousands of coronavirus patients, the crisis has exposed a surprising paradox: Some of the world’s best health systems are remarkably ill-equipped to handle a pandemic.

  • Articles
  • ANALYSIS

The 1930s are often described as the worst of times. Encyclopaedia Britannica calls the period “the harshest adversity faced by Americans since the Civil War.” Author Timothy Egan titled a book on the 1930s Dust Bowl The Worst Hard Time.

  • Articles
  • HEALTH ISSUES

Healthy food can seem to be expensive or overly time-intensive to prepare. That is why, when the budget gets tight, we tend to take the easy way out and buy fast food or heavily processed snacks. These foods are more filling and provide the immediate gratification of “comfort food” ingredients—fat, sugar and sodium.

  • World News Desk
  • HEALTH ISSUES

Josna Begum lives with her son in a house with four other families in a slum in Bangladesh’s capital, Dhaka, the world’s most densely populated city. “Distancing is impossible for us,” she said.

  • Articles
  • HEALTH ISSUES

Those of us who can see clearly (even with the help of glasses or contacts) sometimes take it for granted. Yet a look at conditions in another part of the globe can provide a fresh perspective.

  • World News Desk
  • ECONOMY & PERSONAL FINANCE

Nearly 3.3 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week—nearly five times the previous record set in 1982—amid a widespread economic shutdown caused by the coronavirus.

  • Articles
  • HEALTH ISSUES

As coronavirus cases continue to increase, there is something else spreading like a virus: misinformation. It can seem impossible to separate fact from fiction among rampant rumors and deliberate efforts to mislead. We at The Real Truth magazine are committed to bringing just that: truth. The articles we produce arm readers with ways to verify what they are learning is correct.

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  • MARRIAGE & FAMILY

Think about a time you sat in a public place, perhaps a restaurant, waiting for a bus or a train, at a movie, or maybe on a plane. You were trying to read a book, check your email or just sit quietly and think about your day. Suddenly, you are interrupted by a screaming child nearby!

  • World News Desk
  • HEALTH ISSUES

The death toll from the global pandemic surpassed 10,000 people worldwide and the effects of a global economy grinding to a halt because of the pandemic were beginning to show, from millions of unsold flowers rotting in piles in Kenya to the slow emptying of the world’s skies. In Southern Europe, gasping patients filled sick wards and field hospitals went up in hotels and a convention center in Madrid.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

As the 2020s dawn, a third of a century since the end of the Cold War, Moscow has Washington on its heels. Russian President Vladimir Putin announced that his nation has become the only country in the world to deploy hypersonic weapons.

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  • EUROPE

From the moment the United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community (the European Union’s predecessor) in 1973, the countdown clock to Brexit had already begun ticking. It was just no one knew January 31, 2020, would be the day the bell rang, time’s up!

  • Articles
  • RELIGION

Ever since Benedict XVI announced he would become the first pope in 600 years to resign, Catholic theologians, canon lawyers and others warned of the potential confusion in having two popes living side by side in the Vatican, one reigning, the other retired but calling himself “emeritus pope” and still wearing the white cassock of the papacy.

  • Articles
  • HEALTH ISSUES

Jay Jenkins entered a local convenience store and gas station with a friend. Noticing a cleverly marked package of cannabidiol (CBD) oil, he wondered, what is vaping like?

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  • TERRORISM & SECURITY

Once spanning a large swath of Iraq and Syria, the self-declared caliphate Islamic State was delivered a seeming deathblow in October: United States special forces killed the group’s leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

  • Articles
  • INTERNATIONAL

Dancing orange flames churn thick, putrid, mud-colored smoke in the middle of a once-traffic-congested street in downtown Santiago. It is just one of dozens of car-size fires roiling over piles of debris in Chile’s capital that were set by protesters demanding improvements in health care, public transportation, education and other government-provided services. At a point, 1.2 million people jammed into the city center for a rally.

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